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101-3. 奈良教育大学紀要 (人文・社会科学, 自然科学) >
第65巻 第1号 人文・社会科学 (2016) >

このアイテムの引用には次の識別子を使用してください: http://hdl.handle.net/10105/11032

タイトル: ベッドスクールの誕生と筋ジストロフィー病棟の子どもたち ─戦後病弱教育の成立過程と映画「ぼくのなかの夜と朝」─
その他のタイトル: Bedside Teaching and Children with Progressive Muscular Dystrophy : The origin of education for children with medical needs
著者: 清水, 貞夫
玉村, 公二彦
越野, 和之 
キーワード: 筋ジストロフィー
Progressive Muscular Dystrophy
ベッドスクール
Hospital School
病弱教育
Special Education for Children with Medical Needs
柳沢寿男
Hisao Yanagisawa
ETYP:教育関連論文
発行日: 2016年11月30日
出版者: 奈良教育大学
収録雑誌名: 奈良教育大学紀要. 人文・社会科学
巻: 65
号: 1
開始ページ: 35
終了ページ: 45
ISSN: 05472393
収録種別: 紀要論文
抄録: Hisao Yanagisawa was a movie director who was known for many welfare films. He produced the film named “Nights and Darkness inside My Mind” in 1971. The movie is a documentary film of the children and young adults with Progressive Muscular Dystrophy (PMD). The children were separated from a family life in a community without any knowledge that PMD was an incurable illness when they were first hospitalized. They, however, progressively realize that their lives are not recuperative, becoming less capable of managing their lives. The hospitalized children whose years are under compulsory education had to attend the school established in a sanatorium. They enjoyed their way of school life with teachers, nurses and even medical doctors. Their school life, however, was often destructed into fatal darkness by their friends’ death. PMD is an incurable disease and persons with PMD die young, even today. In this article, the historical development of the hospital school was traced, which originated in bedside instruction toward hospitalized children with Caries or Tuberculosis by volunteer patients. Caries and Tuberculosis were medically conquered dramatically through medications and New School Education Law was enacted, which provides that local cities and towns can dispatch teachers to bedsides to teach sick children. On the other side, the Government planned to convert vacant beds for people with Caries and Tuberculosis into beds for young children and adults with PMD to reduce social catastrophe of families. The Government began to hospitalize young children and adults with PMD in a hospital or sanatorium and the school run by prefectural government was built for them within the sanatorium. Yanagisawa’s documentary portrays daily lives of PMD children and adults in the hospital or sanatorium. It documented both bright and dark sides of the hospitalized, enclosed round of life vividly, cut off from the wider community. Actually sanatoriums was something like a total institution coined by Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman. The sanatorium’s director, Dr. Fumio Kondoh and Hisao Yanagisawa projected it at many places across Japan to promote that Government would decide to establish the National Research Institute for PMDHisao Yanagisawa was a movie director who was known for many welfare films. He produced the film named “Nights and Darkness inside My Mind” in 1971. The movie is a documentary film of the children and young adults with Progressive Muscular Dystrophy (PMD). The children were separated from a family life in a community without any knowledge that PMD was an incurable illness when they were first hospitalized. They, however, progressively realize that their lives are not recuperative, becoming less capable of managing their lives. The hospitalized children whose years are under compulsory education had to attend the school established in a sanatorium. They enjoyed their way of school life with teachers, nurses and even medical doctors. Their school life, however, was often destructed into fatal darkness by their friends’ death. PMD is an incurable disease and persons with PMD die young, even today. In this article, the historical development of the hospital school was traced, which originated in bedside instruction toward hospitalized children with Caries or Tuberculosis by volunteer patients. Caries and Tuberculosis were medically conquered dramatically through medications and New School Education Law was enacted, which provides that local cities and towns can dispatch teachers to bedsides to teach sick children. On the other side, the Government planned to convert vacant beds for people with Caries and Tuberculosis into beds for young children and adults with PMD to reduce social catastrophe of families. The Government began to hospitalize young children and adults with PMD in a hospital or sanatorium and the school run by prefectural government was built for them within the sanatorium. Yanagisawa’s documentary portrays daily lives of PMD children and adults in the hospital or sanatorium. It documented both bright and dark sides of the hospitalized, enclosed round of life vividly, cut off from the wider community. Actually sanatoriums was something like a total institution coined by Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman. The sanatorium’s director, Dr. Fumio Kondoh and Hisao Yanagisawa projected it at many places across Japan to promote that Government would decide to establish the National Research Institute for PMDHisao Yanagisawa was a movie director who was known for many welfare films. He produced the film named “Nights and Darkness inside My Mind” in 1971. The movie is a documentary film of the children and young adults with Progressive Muscular Dystrophy (PMD). The children were separated from a family life in a community without any knowledge that PMD was an incurable illness when they were first hospitalized. They, however, progressively realize that their lives are not recuperative, becoming less capable of managing their lives. The hospitalized children whose years are under compulsory education had to attend the school established in a sanatorium. They enjoyed their way of school life with teachers, nurses and even medical doctors. Their school life, however, was often destructed into fatal darkness by their friends’ death. PMD is an incurable disease and persons with PMD die young, even today.In this article, the historical development of the hospital school was traced, which originated in bedside instruction toward hospitalized children with Caries or Tuberculosis by volunteer patients. Caries and Tuberculosis were medically conquered dramatically through medications and New School Education Law was enacted, which provides that local cities and towns can dispatch teachers to bedsides to teach sick children. On the other side, the Government planned to convert vacant beds for people with Caries and Tuberculosis into beds for young children and adults with PMD to reduce social catastrophe of families. The Government began to hospitalize young children and adults with PMD in a hospital or sanatorium and the school run by prefectural government was built for them within the sanatorium. Yanagisawa’s documentary portrays daily lives of PMD children and adults in the hospital or sanatorium. It ocumented both bright and dark sides of the hospitalized, enclosed round of life vividly, cut off from the wider community. Actually sanatoriums was something like a total institution coined by Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman. The sanatorium’s director, Dr. Fumio Kondoh and Hisao Yanagisawa projected it at many places across Japan to promote that Government would decide to establish the National Research Institute for PMDHisao Yanagisawa was a movie director who was known for many welfare films. He produced the film named “Nights and Darkness inside My Mind” in 1971. The movie is a documentary film of the children and young adults with Progressive Muscular Dystrophy (PMD). The children were separated from a family life in a community without any knowledge that PMD was an incurable illness when they were first hospitalized. They, however, progressively realize that their lives are not recuperative,becoming less capable of managing their lives. The hospitalized children whose years are under compulsory education had to attend the school established in a sanatorium. They enjoyed their way of school life with teachers, nurses and even medical doctors. Their school life, however, was often destructed into fatal darkness by their friends’ death. PMD is an incurable disease and persons with PMD die young, even today.In this article, the historical development of the hospital school was traced, which originated in bedside instruction toward hospitalized children with Caries or Tuberculosis by volunteer patients. Caries and Tuberculosis were medically conquered dramatically through medications and New School Education Law was enacted, which provides that local cities and towns can dispatch teachers to bedsides to teach sick children. On the other side, the Government planned to convert vacant beds for people with Caries and Tuberculosis into beds for young children and adults with PMD to reduce social catastrophe of families. The Government began to hospitalize young children and adults with PMD in a hospital or sanatorium and the school run by prefectural government was built for them within the sanatorium. Yanagisawa’s documentary portrays daily lives of PMD children and adults in the hospital or sanatorium. It documented both bright and dark sides of the hospitalized, enclosed round of life vividly, cut off from the wider community. Actually sanatoriums was something like a total institution coined by Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman. The sanatorium’s director, Dr. Fumio Kondoh and Hisao Yanagisawa projected it at many places across Japan to promote that Government would decide to establish the National Research Institute for PMD.
言語: jpn
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10105/11032
出現コレクション:第65巻 第1号 人文・社会科学 (2016)

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